Plan for age restricted condos on Monroe Turnpike receives wetlands approval

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This drawing by J. Edwards & Associates LLC shows the proposed layout for a 27-unit age restricted condo complex at 1271 Monroe Turnpike.

MONROE, CT — Inland Wetlands Commissioners approved an application to build 27 units of age restricted housing at 1271 Monroe Turnpike, across from Stevenson firehouse, at their meeting on Oct. 27.

The plan also needs approval for a zone change from the Planning and Zoning Commission, which closed its hearing on Oct. 21 and directed Town Planner Rick Schultz to draft a resolution of approval members can vote on at their next meeting.

The applicant, 1271 Monroe Turnpike LLC, wants to change the 14.9-acre-site from a Residential Farming-2 zone to an ARR zone, allowing a multi-unit age restricted development.

Then the developer would have to come back with a site plan application.

The condo complex for those age 55 and older would include five buildings with four units each, seven detached units and a small community building where all residents get their mail.

Planning and Zoning commissioner Leon Ambrosey, left, looks at boundary lines with Town Planner Rick Schultz, center, and Chairman Michael O’Reilly at a hearing on Oct. 21.

The condos would be upscale with the majority being two-bedroom units. Larry Edwards, the engineer for the project, said each unit would have a basement for storage and four parking spaces, which would include a two-car garage and two more spaces outside.

He said each unit would be 40-by-50 with 1,600 square feet on the first floor. While the one bedroom units would be one floor, the two bedroom units would be two stories, totaling at least 2,000-square-feet, with a bedroom on each floor.

All units would be handicap accessible.

The complex would be served by public water and each building would have its own septic system.

Edwards made some changes to the plan is response to commissioners’ questions and recommendations from Town Engineer Scott Schatzlein.

Among the changes, the access road was moved approximately 10 feet away from an isolated wetland to increase the buffer, a replacement culvert under the driveway will be built to town standards, and water diverted from a wetland will be restored and then some.

The applicant also included language for a conservation easement.

Members of both the Inland Wetlands and Planning and Zoning commissions appeared to be satisfied with the revisions and no questions were asked before the close of the two hearings.

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